Wednesday, September 16, 2015

Characteristics of the Accents in different books

I don't know if the accents are used in different ways in different books. Except we learned something about the 21 books and the 3 books in the first two posts from this month - that in the 3 the rest on A is approached often without the g and in the 21 it is rarely approached without the g.

What I am wondering is whether the mode of a piece could be inferred from the patterns that are used in the phrases. The first tests will be to see if there are differences between books (in the 21). Then possibly we can see if there are hints of the mode anywhere.

So I decided to test Deuteronomy against Ezekiel as a first try. There is so much information it is difficult to tell if there will be a difference.

How does each approach the rest? How does each return to the tonic? These are the patterns used more than 20 times in these books. You can tell right away that no pattern is unique to a book. [My first lists were misleading - I have partitioned them differently]. The rows are sorted on the note sequence so you can inspect it to see if this sequence is shared. I have no conclusions at this early stage. But this is easier than meditating on degrees of rule.

Deuteronomye B f g# B ^A11
Ezekiele B f g# B ^A23
Deuteronomye B f g# ^A22
Ezekiele B f g# ^A29
Deuteronomye B g# B ^A27
Ezekiele B g# B ^A39
Deuteronomye B g# ^A19
Ezekiele B g# ^A22
Deuteronomye C B f g# ^A10
Ezekiele C B f g# ^A19
Deuteronomye C B g# B ^A11
Ezekiele C B g# B ^A25
Deuteronomye C B g# ^A14
Ezekiele C B g# ^A12
Deuteronomye C f g# ^A12
Ezekiele C f g# ^A25
Deuteronomye C g# B ^A14
Ezekiele C g# B ^A12
Deuteronomye C g# ^A8
Ezekiele C g# ^A20
Deuteronomye d f g# ^A20
Ezekiele d f g# ^A13
Deuteronomye f g# B ^A29
Ezekiele f g# B ^A49
Deuteronomye f g# ^A58
Ezekiele f g# ^A35
Deuteronomye f g# f e2
Ezekiele f g# f e38
Deuteronomye g# B ^A21
Ezekiele g# B ^A49
Deuteronomye g# ^A32
Ezekiele g# ^A49
There are 899 more patterns between 1 and 20 times. The data is a bit overwhelming. And we have not considered the variations introduced by the ornaments.

Here are the patterns for returning to the tonic - 21 or more times. The descending tri-tone is not uncommon. Neither is the diminished arpeggio. A good singer gets it clearly in the ear and finds it easy to reproduce though it is not common in the music of the last 400 years (apart from certain parts in Bach).
DeuteronomyA B f g# e32
EzekielA B f g# e23
DeuteronomyA B f g# f e9
EzekielA B f g# f e22
DeuteronomyA B g# e30
EzekielA B g# e46
DeuteronomyA B g# f e44
EzekielA B g# f e41
DeuteronomyA C B f g# e15
EzekielA C B f g# e20
DeuteronomyA C B g# e7
EzekielA C B g# e22
DeuteronomyA C B g# f e13
EzekielA C B g# f e39
DeuteronomyA C f g# e10
EzekielA C f g# e27
DeuteronomyA C g# e12
EzekielA C g# e14
DeuteronomyA C g# f e13
EzekielA C g# f e26
DeuteronomyA c d f g# f e8
EzekielA c d f g# f e14
DeuteronomyA d f g# e15
EzekielA d f g# e21
DeuteronomyA d f g# f e9
EzekielA d f g# f e16
DeuteronomyA e f g# e17
EzekielA e f g# e9
DeuteronomyA e g# f e10
EzekielA e g# f e12
DeuteronomyA f g# e92
EzekielA f g# e103
DeuteronomyA f g# f e49
EzekielA f g# f e76
DeuteronomyA g# e56
EzekielA g# e87
DeuteronomyA g# f e45
EzekielA g# f e77

There are 514 in the 20 or fewer table, including 293 unique sequences.


No comments:

Post a Comment